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28 Jun 2010
* Unknown *
Posts:22
Italian Schools/Day Cares near Support Site?

My son will be 4 the end of August and I would like to enroll him in an italian school.  If someone knows of any good italian schools near support site please let me know.

 

Thanks.

28 Jun 2010
* Unknown *
Posts:22
Re: Italian Schools/Day Cares near Support Site?

I just wanted to pass some important information.

If your child is 3 or older he can go to any public school for free.

The hours are from 8.30 to around 4.pm depending on the school.

They give you lunch, you just need to buy the tickets. The food is a complete italian style first and second course ,fruit .....

You don't need to pay any privite school the public ones are as good if not better, the teachers are really qualified.

Instead in the public the teachers are not really teachers they are there to learn to be teachers.

I am italian and I know how it all works.

 

29 Jun 2010
* Unknown *
Posts:22
Re: Italian Schools/Day Cares near Support Site?

The only hesitations I have for putting my children in Public Italian schools are the state of the schools themselves. I have toured the public school in Gricignano and was appalled by the disrepair of the place. Broken windows in classrooms, flooring that was left to crumble IN classrooms, and the fact that paint was chipping from the walls. When I asked someone in the main office if they were planning on repairing the building (because the broken windows would make for a very cold learning environment during the winter) She said, "No, the children will be required to wear sweaters in the classroom." What?! A broken window is not only hazardous because of the chance the window could break further bringing glass down inside the classroom and possibly on a student, but then to turn around and say that? 

I get that it is a cheaper option, but I would rather pay the extra money to a school that takes care of the building in which it teaches children. 
 This could possibly be only that school's situation and other public options are just fine, but it gave me a bad feeling towards the Public schools in general.  

29 Jun 2010
* Unknown *
Posts:22
Re: Italian Schools/Day Cares near Support Site?

Just out of curiosity. Which school did you visit with broken windows and people telling you that kids will wear sweaters to keep themselves warm? U sure you were in Italy or are you a "little" exaggerating.

To me it sounds like Iraq or something.

06 Jul 2010
lisa
Posts:2
Re: Italian Schools/Day Cares near Support Site?

HI, I'm american and I married an Italian men many years ago,my son attend to italian state school without problems. I worked as mothertongue teacher in both school, in my opinion some of state school nearby Gricignano have   good teachers.I know, that most of them before working in a state school, was in a private.

29 Sep 2010
Erika
Posts:34
Re: Italian Schools/Day Cares near Support Site?

Are teachers allowed to smoke near the children in Italian Public Schools?  My friend had that experience, but I don't know if that is the norm, or just something odd. She took her child out of the school for a few different reasons, but the smoking did not help the issue.  Thanks.

30 Sep 2010
Cristina
Posts:25
Re: Re: Italian Schools/Day Cares near Support Site?

Cit. Erika wrote:
Are teachers allowed to smoke near the children in Italian Public Schools?  My friend had that experience, but I don't know if that is the norm, or just something odd. She took her child out of the school for a few different reasons, but the smoking did not help the issue.  Thanks.


No they are not. By law, people cannot smoke in public buildings (Restaurants, schools, stores...). Unfortunately, the law does not say anything about smoking next to children outdoor.

30 Sep 2010
ANON
Posts:28
Re: Italian Schools/Day Cares near Support Site?

I've had my children in Italian schools (albeit private ones) since we arrived in Italy (this is our 4th school year).  The best option is to do what you are doing and 'visit' schools that you may be interested in, check out the classrooms, etc. 

I strongly recommend visiting the classroom your child would be assigned to see how the teacher behaves and how the students behave.   Italian students, in our experience, tend to be a bit more aggressive and disruptive than Americans, but a good teacher will keep this in check.  If not, you don't want your child attending.

There is no smoking allowed on school premises, but that doesn't mean that parents adhere to it.  In fact, our current school just had to send out a notice to Italian parents reminding them that it is absolutely forbidden to smoke on school 'property' not just inside the school. 

There are good Italian schools, you may just have to venture beyond Gricignano to find them.  Don't give up!!!